In the spirit of literacy and letter writing

May 21, 2015 § 8 Comments

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you may recall that a while ago I recommended several books for kids featuring letters and sending mail.  Why?  Because books in the hands of children create readers and inspire new interests.  Besides, who among us doesn’t love a good book about mail?  And these have the added bonus of great illustrations!  So, in the spirit of literacy and letter writing, today I recommend four books; three about letter carriers of different flavors, and one about the era when you could mail order a house.


Millie Waits for the Mail by Alexander Steffensmeier

You may think that dogs are the stuff of nightmares for mail carriers, but that’s only because you haven’t yet read about Millie. Oh, yes, she waits for the mail — to be more precise, she lies in wait and takes great glee in scaring the mail carrier. Oh, my.

This book has conflict and a smooshed package, but, fear not, it ends happily.


A Letter for Leo by Sergio Ruzzier

A story about Leo who delivers the mail, makes a friend when he is kind to a stranger, and–finally!–receives a letter of his own.


Mr Griggs’ Work by Cynthia Rylant

Mr. Griggs "spent millions of minutes of his long life shuffling through letters, watching the pictures on the stamps change, punching his First Class puncher, weighting fat brown boxes, and listening to long tales bout 'The Letter That Never Got There.'"

Mr. Griggs “spent millions of minutes of his long life shuffling through letters, watching the pictures on the stamps change, punching his First Class puncher, weighing fat brown boxes, and listening to long tales about ‘The Letter That Never Got There.'” 

Need I say more or is that enough to sell you on getting to know Mr. Griggs?  (I really love this one.)


And the bonus book: The House in the Mail by Rosemary and Tom Wells

This one is less about mail and more about the process of constructing a mail order house, BUT it’s a great slice of history and shows what a wonder mail order merchandise was in the 1920s–something that may not have happened without the USPS’s introduction of Rural Free Delivery in 1896.


Now, run to your library and ask for these books.  Then find a child and share.  Enjoy!

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So you can be sure it is a real letter.

November 14, 2014 § 4 Comments

Just then the mailman came by Villa Villekulla.

“Well, sometimes one does have good luck,” exclaimed Pippi, “and meets a mailman just when one needs him!”

She ran out into the street. “Will you please be so kind as to deliver this to Miss Pippi Longstocking at once?” she said. “It’s urgent.”

The mailman looked first at the letter and then at Pippi.  “Aren’t you Pippi Longstocking yourself?” he asked.

“Sure. Who did you think I was, the Empress of Abyssinia?”

“But why don’t you take the letter yourself?”

“Why don’t I take the letter myself?” said Pippi. “Should I be delivering the letter myself?  No, that’s going too far.  Do you mean to say that people have to deliver their letters themselves nowadays?  What do we have mailmen for, then?  We might as well get rid of them.  I’ve never in my life heard anything so foolish.  No, my lad, if that’s the way you do your work, they’ll never make a postmaster out of you, you can be sure of that.”

The mailman decided it was just as well to do what she wished, so he dropped the letter in the mailbox at Villa Villekulla.  It had scarcely landed before Pippi eagerly pulled it out again.

“Oh, how curious I am!” she said to Tommy and Annika.  “This is the first letter I ever got in my life.”

All three children sat down on the porch steps, and Pippi slit open the envelope.  Tommy and Annika looked over her shoulder and read.

DARLING PIPPI,

I SIRTINLEE HOP U R NOT SIK. IT WOOD BE 2 BAD 4 U 2 BE SIK. MYSELF I AM JUST FIN. THER IS 0 RONG WITH THE WHETHER ETHER. YESTERDAY TOMY KILT 1 BIG RAT. YES.

THAT IS WHAT HE DID.

BEST WISHIS FORM

PIPPI

“Oh,” said Pippi, delighted, “it says exactly the same things in my letter that it does in the one you wrote to your grandmother, Tommy.  So you can be sure it is a real letter.  I’ll keep it as long as I live.”

from Pippi Goes on Board by Astrid Lindgren, translated by Florence Lamborn

While Pippi may disagree and etiquette books will instruct you differently, the construction of letters is a wide open field of possiblities.  Having a variety of correspondents means encountering different approaches to letter writing and repeated opportunities to expand my own ideas on what constitutes a “real” letter.

I used to rate long letters as more real than any other kind.  Over the years, I’ve developed an appreciation for compact letters, postcards, and things that are not letters at all.  In part, I think my new definition of what constitutes a real letter has developed as I changed my thinking on whether letters need to be a 1:1 exchange.

In addition to writing to people I know only through letters, I also like to send letters to people who I know in real life.  Not all of those people are letter-writers.  Sometimes I mail a note to a friend and get a text in reply or a Facebook post saying “thank you!”  I think that’s great, because even though it’s a different medium, it brings the connection started by the letter full circle.  And in my book, regardless of length or construction, the realest letters are the ones that create connections.

How do you define a real letter?

The Swift Completion of Their Appointed Rounds

October 29, 2012 § 4 Comments

Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds.

~modified quotation from Book 8, Paragraph 98, of The Persian Wars by Herodotus

There is no official USPS motto, but these words of tribute, inscribed on the New York City Post Office on 8th Street, are often invoked in description of the dedication letter carriers bring to their work.  Despite warnings that Hurricane Sandy might disrupt mail service on the East Coast of the United States, the unofficial motto held true today!

Hooray for the USPS!  Despite the looming hurricane, the mail was not only delivered, but arrived early at my house today.

Because there was a package for me, the letter carrier brought the mail to the porch where I met him and told him that he deserved extra gold stars for his work today.  I wished him a safe rest of the day and came inside dancing with glee because the package was from the Letter Writers Alliance!  I’d ordered it, so I knew what was inside, but opening it was still a treat.

Cheerful packaging…

…covering a lovely brown paper package tied up with string.

With a message for me…

…and a really neat artistamp designed by Donovan. (Visit the LWA’s blog to learn more about postal camels or to learn how you can join the LWA ranks.)

After admiring the packaging, I peeked inside where I found one thing to share…

One more detail in place for the upcoming Type In & Letter Writing Social. Sweet.

Join us on December 7th and you might find yourself putting together a letter with these very same goodies. So much fun!

…and one thing all for me.

I’ve had my eye on this since I became a member of the LWA over a year ago. Having reached Scribbling Glue’s first blogiversary, I celebrated by indulging myself.

I’ve put it to the test and give it full marks for a satisfying cup of tea while letter writing.

And now I will go back to letter writing and making things while I wait out the rest of Hurricane Sandy.  At present, the wind is really picking up, but all is well and the power is still on.  I’m counting myself very fortunate so far.

Write a Letter to the Pigeon

September 30, 2012 § 2 Comments

I love this idea so much.  So much!

Lexington Park Library has recently implemented a new learning center for kids that is centered around creating and delivering mail.  When they visit the library, kids are encouraged to write letters to well-known characters from children’s books.  After the letters are written, the writer hand-delivers the letters to the mailboxes that are mounted in different places around the department.  There is even a letter carrier costume for kids to wear when they are delivering the letters.

Building literacy skills + writing to story book characters + playing letter carrier = nothing but WIN!

Delivered with Good Cheer

September 22, 2012 § 2 Comments

Yesterday I happened to be home for lunch when the mail arrived.  There was a package for me, so the letter carrier–not the one who most often covers my route–brought the mail up to the front door.  As he came up the walkway, he called out in a town crier sort of way, “Mailman! Mail call for the house!”  I opened the door to find him grinning on my doorstep.  “What did you think of that announcement?” he asked, beaming.  “It was excellent,” I assured him.  He handed me the mail and laughed, “I haven’t tried singing one yet, but maybe tomorrow.”

One can only hope!

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